What remains of the Santa Fe forest along Highway 4 in New Mexico after the 2011 Las Conchas Fire. (David Gilkey/NPR) 
Part of NPR’s series on wildfires - how decades of fire prevention has had unintended consequences in the Southwest. 

What remains of the Santa Fe forest along Highway 4 in New Mexico after the 2011 Las Conchas Fire. (David Gilkey/NPR)

Part of NPR’s series on wildfires - how decades of fire prevention has had unintended consequences in the Southwest. 

Statistics on journalists killed over the past 20 years.
explore-blog:

A chilling look at the 648 journalists murdered since 1992, by the numbers and faces.

Statistics on journalists killed over the past 20 years.

explore-blog:

A chilling look at the 648 journalists murdered since 1992, by the numbers and faces.

(Source: explore-blog)

theatlantic:

The Collapse of Print Advertising in One Graph

Call it creative if you want, but this is what economic destruction looks like. Print newspaper ads have fallen by two-thirds from $60 billion in the late-1990s to $20 billion in 2011. You sometimes hear it said that newspapers are dead. Now, $20 billion is the kind of “dead” most people would trade their lives for. You never hear anybody say “bars and nightclubs are dead!” when in fact that industry’s current revenue amounts to an identical $20 billion.So the reason newspapers are in trouble isn’t that they aren’t making lots of money — they still are; advertising is a huge, huge business, as any app developer will try to tell you — but that their business models and payroll depend on so much more money. The U.S. newspaper industry was built to support $50 billion to $60 billion in total advertising with the kind of staffs that a $50 billion industry can abide. The layoffs, buyouts, and bankruptcies you hear about are the result of this massive correction in the face of falling revenue. The Internet took out print’s knees in the last decade — not all print, but a lot.
Read more. [Image: Mark J. Perry]

theatlantic:

The Collapse of Print Advertising in One Graph

Call it creative if you want, but this is what economic destruction looks like. Print newspaper ads have fallen by two-thirds from $60 billion in the late-1990s to $20 billion in 2011. 

You sometimes hear it said that newspapers are dead. Now, $20 billion is the kind of “dead” most people would trade their lives for. You never hear anybody say “bars and nightclubs are dead!” when in fact that industry’s current revenue amounts to an identical $20 billion.

So the reason newspapers are in trouble isn’t that they aren’t making lots of money — they still are; advertising is a huge, huge business, as any app developer will try to tell you — but that their business models and payroll depend on so much more money. The U.S. newspaper industry was built to support $50 billion to $60 billion in total advertising with the kind of staffs that a $50 billion industry can abide. The layoffs, buyouts, and bankruptcies you hear about are the result of this massive correction in the face of falling revenue. The Internet took out print’s knees in the last decade — not all print, but a lot.

Read more. [Image: Mark J. Perry]